Indian fairy tales


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Some of the stuff has been translated idiomatically, more than in Day's' fairies, for instance, as the magical women. Both he and Day have a story about The Boy with the Moon on his Forehead, but though you can recognize the common type, it's not the same tale. Jun 10, Hal Brodsky rated it liked it Shelves: own , kindle. These tales collected from Asia in the early 20th century are quite different from the Grimm's and Aesops tales I grew up with though in an appendix in the rear of the book the author claims most European Fairy Tales originated in India.

These tales are rich with talking animals and insects that interact with humans, which the author explains again in the Appendix, so you may want to read that first fits easily with Hindu and Buddhist ideas of reincarnation. In fact, in many of these tales, These tales collected from Asia in the early 20th century are quite different from the Grimm's and Aesops tales I grew up with though in an appendix in the rear of the book the author claims most European Fairy Tales originated in India.

In fact, in many of these tales, the narrator explains that one of the animals is the Buddha in a pre-Buddha incarnation. This book is free for Kindle Download. Mar 08, Heather Branson rated it really liked it. I enjoy reading these collections of fairy tales from other cultures. I think it helps to give some ground work for understanding other people when you can find the commonality in the stories we tell our children.

Jan 25, J. Wexford rated it liked it. Not an easy read, but enlightening. Aug 07, Yulia Dibrovska rated it really liked it. If you want to approach the Indian culture just read their tales Early Indian folktales, some of the earliest in the world, collected more than years before the Grimm brothers began their many times over translated tales. Which brings me to the problem with this book: translation. You can no doubt push your way through and understand the story, but many of the tales lose their meaning or moral in the end.

You have a mixed bag out there.

Indian fairy tales

Illustration is amazing!! Hope this helps a little. Aug 25, Matt Miles rated it liked it. As is often the case with fairy tale collections, some of the stories are more entertaining than others, and the more bizarre the better, but what fascinates me is a running theme in early stories that kindness and innocence do not ensure survival and therefore cleverness and even deception is to be more highly valued.

Indian Fairy Tales - Table of Contents - IntraText CT

The rest are standard fairy tale fare, but more than not are still a brisk, fun read. Aug 19, K Sadashiv added it. Good for children Book does not consider wide and deeply rooted stories of India but more of Arabic and mugal era stories which are least known in India.

But stories keep children focused and help them like reading. Aug 10, Sheetal Bahl rated it did not like it. I'm not sure whether these tales are imbecilic, or if the author's take on them is plain stupid, or if they are just terribly written, but either way, this collection is insufferable. Actually, let me correct that - everything that I read was insufferable - I didn't bother to read the rest. Nov 09, Kevin Stilley rated it it was ok Shelves: audio-books. I am not a fan of Indian Fairy Tales -- they tend to have the undisciplined, meandering quality of tales typically told by children, and the arbitrariness of a sleeper's dream.

Apr 08, Amy rated it liked it Shelves: fairytales-and-retellings. This book was a times a bit of a grind. Some of the stories were very entertaining and dynamic while others felt disjointed. I would recommend this as a book that you occasionally pick up and read one or two stories at a time. There are a couple stories that I know I'll be revisiting. There is a good mix of fables with animals and human characters.

Great for adults that love fairytales and for younger accelerated readers as well. I will say that having the automatic dictionary and wikipedia with This book was a times a bit of a grind. I will say that having the automatic dictionary and wikipedia with the Kindle was necessary to understand some of the stories though. One thing that makes this book remarkable though as far as fairytale collections go is the annotations. Its really common for english authors to take cultural stories and offer them up with no context or reason for their authenticity.

Jacobs however has done extensive research on these stories and offers his findings to the reader. Every story has an explanation and commentary really giving the reader an understanding of its significance. It is a very well researched collection and a good read for fairytale enthusiasts. Dec 07, Danzaiss rated it liked it. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.

It was easy to draw the connection between the stories and their roots in Buddhist literature, and they provided entertaining insight into early Indian folklore and culture. However, the proposition that Indian folklore is the root of all other cultures folklore was too great a stretch to accept. Citing common themes and claiming to have said it first doesn't translate to being the root source of a myth. The human experience is rife with common, cross-cultural experiences. The telling of folk tales and myths is a cultural universal, common to all basic and complex societies.

Common themes within these tales and myths is simply a reflection of common human thoughts and experiences. I suggest reading the tales and skipping the rest. If you want to explore the themes that are common to cross-cultural tales and myths, read Joseph Campbell. Nov 28, John Davis rated it liked it. An amusing collection of fairy tales from India compiled by Joseph Jacobs, a folklorist of the early last century.

Many of the tales have similar moral lessons found in the tales of various other cultures especially Europe. Though this is the case with most of the tales there were a couple that simply left me scratching my head and wondering what the original story teller was trying to convey to their listeners.

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Perhaps just lost in cultural translation but most left no doubts and were even laug An amusing collection of fairy tales from India compiled by Joseph Jacobs, a folklorist of the early last century. Perhaps just lost in cultural translation but most left no doubts and were even laugh-out-loud with understanding!

Jacobs ends the collection with thoughts on the possible Indian origins of many of the fairy tales of Europe that would have come to the west via contact with Easterners in the Crusades. Mar 01, Dione Basseri rated it liked it Shelves: genre-fantasy , genre-childrens , type-prose , genre-classics , genre-anthology , genre-cultural-indian. The introduction by Jacobs is fairly interesting, as he speculates on the similarity between the tales in this collection and those of other European-focused collections. He proposes that India is the origin of many of these tales, and, while I can't attest to the actual provenance, I was glad he didn't just throw out the idea that they were transplanted from Europe.

Overall, it's an It really does sound mostly like the most popular of fairy tales--such as Cinderella--were plop The introduction by Jacobs is fairly interesting, as he speculates on the similarity between the tales in this collection and those of other European-focused collections. It really does sound mostly like the most popular of fairy tales--such as Cinderella--were plopped down in a new setting. I think if you're looking for authentic Indian stories, this isn't a good source, but it's fairly entertaining.

I listened to a free audio production from Librivox. Its not often you come across Fairy Tales actually categorised by the country in which they originate, but here you have an Indian volume of such. Originally published in the 19th C. Abela Publishing is currently republishing these and donating a good proportion of their profits to charity. Some are familiar but set in India and others totally new - or at least they seem so, if only because the book was originally published in and the "new" stories have been f Its not often you come across Fairy Tales actually categorised by the country in which they originate, but here you have an Indian volume of such.

Some are familiar but set in India and others totally new - or at least they seem so, if only because the book was originally published in and the "new" stories have been forgotten in the last years. The link to the book is Indian Fairy Tales Dec 22, Anupam Bansoodeb rated it really liked it. A good collection of Indian fairy tales ranging from beast tales through drolls to the more serious type. Some of the tales are oversimplistic in their delivery; hence the four star rating.

But fortunately, this shortcoming is compensated by the thrill of adventure and moral import of the other stories. A very pleasant reading experience altogether. It is interesting to note that a lot of European fairy tales, such as those of Grimm, Aesop, Jean de la Fontaine, etc can be traced directly to I A good collection of Indian fairy tales ranging from beast tales through drolls to the more serious type.

It is interesting to note that a lot of European fairy tales, such as those of Grimm, Aesop, Jean de la Fontaine, etc can be traced directly to India! Its a quick lighthearted read. I'm curious on what is lost in translation without cultural context-- what were we suppose to take away when characters killed, stole and cheated without further elaboration on morality or connection to later parts of the stories. You cannot stay in my house.

You see it is evening, and if I go into the jungle, then the wild beasts will eat me. Then she took him into her house, and the Raja's son [9] was very glad. The old woman began preparing dinner, but he stopped her, "Aunty," he said, "I will give you food. The old woman and the Raja's son then dined together. When it was full, the prince cried out, "Stop, bowl," and the bowl stopped filling. By this time night had come. When it was quite black night the princess got up. She dressed herself in her rich clothes and jewels, and rolled up her hair, and across her head she put a band of diamonds and pearls.

Then she shone like the moon, and her beauty made night day. She came out of her room, and sat on the roof of her palace. In the daytime she never came out of her house; she only came out at night. All the people in her father's country then went about their work and finished it. The Raja's son watched the princess quietly, and was very happy. He said to himself, "How lovely she is! At midnight, when everybody had gone to bed, the princess came down from her roof, and went to her room; and when she was in bed and asleep, the Raja's son got up softly, and sat on his bed. The young Raja took his bag and said, "I want a great deal of betel-leaf," and it at once gave him quantities of betel-leaf.

This he laid near the princess's bed, and then his little bed carried him back to the old woman's house. Next morning all the princess's servants found the betel-leaf, and began to eat it. Nobody knew the prince had come in the night and put it all there. In the morning the old woman came to the Raja's son.

So he stayed, and they took their dinner out of the bag, and the bowl gave them water. When night came the princess got up and sat on her roof, and at twelve o'clock, when every one was in bed, she went to her bed-room, and was soon fast asleep. Then the Raja's son sat on his bed, and it carried him to the [11] princess. He took his bag and said, "Bag, I want a most lovely shawl. Then he went back to the old woman's house and slept till morning. In the morning, when the princess saw the shawl she was delighted.

Let me stay a few days longer. I will remain hidden in your house, so that no one may see me. When it was black night, the princess put on her lovely clothes and jewels, and sat on her roof. At midnight she went to her room and went to sleep. Then the Raja's son sat on his bed and flew to her bed-room. There he said to his bag, "Bag, I want a very, very beautiful ring. Then he took the Princess Labam's hand gently to put on the ring, and she started up very much frightened. Why do you come to my room? I am a great Raja's son. Hiraman parrot, who lives in the jungle where I went to hunt, told me your name, and then I left my father and mother, and came to see you.

The prince then returned to the old woman's house; and when morning came the princess said to her mother, "The son of a great Raja has come to this country, and I wish to marry him. If he fails I will kill him. I will give him eighty pounds weight of mustard seed, and out of this he must crush the oil in one day. If he cannot do this he shall die. In the morning the Raja's son told the old woman that he intended to marry the princess. A great many Rajas and Rajas' sons have come here to marry her, and her father has had them all killed.

He says whoever wishes to marry his daughter must first do whatever he bids him. If he can, then he shall marry the princess; if he cannot, the king will have him killed. But no one can do the things the king tells him to do; so all the Rajas and Rajas' sons who have tried have been put to death. You will be killed too, if you try. Do go away. The king sent for the prince to the old woman's house, and his servants brought the Raja's son to the king's court-house to the king.

There the king gave him eighty pounds of mustard seed, and told him to crush all the oil out of it that day, and bring it next morning to him to the court-house. If he cannot, then I have him killed. So if you cannot crush all the oil out of this mustard seed, you will die. The prince was very sorry when he heard this. At last he remembered the Ant-Raja, and the moment he did so, the Ant-Raja and his ants came to him. The prince showed him the mustard seed, and said to him, "How can I crush the oil out of all this mustard seed in one day? And if I do not take the oil to the king to-morrow morning, he will kill me.

The prince was very glad when he saw the oil. The next morning he took it to the court-house to the king. But the king said, "You cannot yet marry my daughter.

Indian Fairy Tales

If you wish to do so, you must first fight with my two demons and kill them. He was afraid to let them loose for fear they would eat up all the people in his country; and he did not know how to kill them. So all the kings and kings' sons who wanted to marry the Princess Labam had to fight with these demons; [14] "for," said the king to himself, "perhaps the demons may be killed, and then I shall be rid of them.

When he heard of the demons the Raja's son was very sad. How can I do this? I and my wife will fight with them for you. Then the Raja's son took out of his bag two splendid coats. They were all gold and silver, and covered with pearls and diamonds. These he put on the tigers to make them beautiful, and he took them to the king, and said to him, "May these tigers fight your demons for me?

Up in the sky I have a kettle-drum. You must go and beat it. If you cannot do this, I will kill you. The Raja's son thought of his little bed; so he went to the old woman's house and sat on his bed. I want to go to it. Still, when he came down, the king would not give him his daughter. Then the king showed him the trunk of a tree that was lying near his court-house. It was a very, very thick trunk. He gave the prince a wax hatchet, and said, "To-morrow morning you must cut this trunk in two with this wax hatchet.

The Raja's son went back to the old woman's house. He was very sad, and thought that now the Raja would certainly kill him. My bed helped me to beat his kettle-drum. But now what can I do? How can I cut that thick tree-trunk in two with a wax hatchet? At night he went on his bed to see the princess. How can I ever do that? Then she pulled out a hair from her head, and gave it to the prince. The prince next day did exactly as the princess had told him; and the minute the hair that was stretched down the edge of the hatchet-blade touched the tree-trunk it split into two pieces.

The king said, "Now you can marry my daughter. All the Rajas and kings of the countries round were asked to come to it, and there were great rejoicings. After a few days the prince's son said to his wife, "Let us go to my father's country. The prince always kept his bag, bowl, bed, and stick; only, as no one ever came to make war on him, he never needed to use the stick.

Now one day he set off to visit his Granny, and was jumping with joy to think of all the good things he should get from her, when who should he meet but a Jackal, who looked at the tender young morsel and said: "Lambikin! I'll eat YOU! By-and-by he met a Vulture, and the Vulture, looking hungrily at the tender morsel before him, said: "Lambikin! And by-and-by he met a Tiger, and then a Wolf, and a Dog, and an Eagle, and all these, when they saw the tender little morsel, said: "Lambikin!

At last he reached his Granny's house, and said, all in a great hurry, "Granny, dear, I've promised to get very fat; so, as people ought to keep their promises, please put me into the corn-bin at once. So his Granny said he was a good boy, and put him into the corn-bin, and there the greedy little Lambikin stayed for seven days, and ate, and ate, and ate, until he could scarcely waddle, and his Granny said he was fat enough for anything, and must go home.

But cunning little Lambikin said that would never do, for some animal would be sure to eat him on the way back, he was so plump and tender. So his Granny made a nice little drumikin out of his brother's skin, with the wool inside, and Lambikin curled himself up snug and warm in the middle, and trundled away gaily. Soon he met with the Eagle, who called out:. At last the Jackal came limping along, for all his sorry looks as sharp as a needle, and he too called out—.

But he never got any further, for the Jackal recognised his voice at once, and cried: "Hullo! Just you come out of that! They were all good girls; but the youngest, named Balna, was more clever than the rest. The Raja's wife died when they were quite little children, so these seven poor Princesses were left with no mother to take care of them. The Raja's daughters took it by turns to cook their father's dinner every day, whilst he was absent deliberating with his Ministers on the affairs of the nation.

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About this time the Prudhan died, leaving a widow and one daughter; and every day, every day, when the seven [22] Princesses were preparing their father's dinner, the Prudhan's widow and daughter would come and beg for a little fire from the hearth. Then Balna used to say to her sisters, "Send that woman away; send her away.

Let her get the fire at her own house. What does she want with ours? If we allow her to come here, we shall suffer for it some day. But the other sisters would answer, "Be quiet, Balna; why must you always be quarrelling with this poor woman? Let her take some fire if she likes.

Now the Raja was very fond of his daughters. Ever since their mother's death they had cooked his dinner with their own hands, in order to avoid the danger of his being poisoned by his enemies. So, when he found the mud mixed up with his dinner, he thought it must arise from their carelessness, as it did not seem likely that any one should have put mud there on purpose; but being very kind he did not like to reprove them for it, although this spoiling of the curry was repeated many successive days. At last, one day, he determined to hide, and watch his daughters cooking, and see how it all happened; so he went into the next room, and watched them through a hole in the wall.

There he saw his seven daughters carefully washing the rice and preparing the curry, and as each dish was completed, they put it by the fire ready to be cooked. Next he noticed the Prudhan's widow come to the door, and beg [23] for a few sticks from the fire to cook her dinner with. Balna turned to her, angrily, and said, "Why don't you keep fuel in your own house, and not come here every day and take ours? Sisters, don't give this woman any more wood; let her buy it for herself.

Then the eldest sister answered, "Balna, let the poor woman take the wood and the fire; she does us no harm. The Raja then saw the Prudhan's widow go to the place where all his dinner was nicely prepared, and, as she took the wood, she threw a little mud into each of the dishes. At this he was very angry, and sent to have the woman seized and brought before him. But when the widow came, she told him that she had played this trick because she wanted to gain an audience with him; and she spoke so cleverly, and pleased him so well with her cunning words, that instead of punishing her, the Raja married her, and made her his Ranee, and she and her daughter came to live in the palace.

Now the new Ranee hated the seven poor Princesses, and wanted to get them, if possible, out of the way, in order that her daughter might have all their riches, and live in the palace as Princess in their place; and instead of being grateful to them for their kindness to her, she did all she could to make them miserable. She gave them nothing but bread to eat, and very little of that, and very little water to drink; so these seven poor little Princesses, who had been accustomed to have everything comfortable about them, and [24] good food and good clothes all their lives long, were very miserable and unhappy; and they used to go out every day and sit by their dead mother's tomb and cry—and say:.

One day, whilst they were thus sobbing and crying, lo and behold! Then the Ranee said to her daughter, "I cannot tell how it is, every day those seven girls say they don't want any dinner, and won't eat any; and yet they never grow thin nor look ill; they look better than you do. I cannot tell how it is. So next day, when the Princesses went to their mother's grave, and were eating the beautiful pomeloes, the Prudhan's daughter followed them, and saw them gathering the fruit.

Then Balna said to her sisters, "Do you not see that girl watching us? Let us drive her away, or hide the pomeloes, else she will go and tell her mother all about it, and that will be very bad for us. But the other sisters said, "Oh no, do not be unkind, Balna. The girl would never be so cruel as to tell her mother. Let us rather invite her to come and have some [25] of the fruit. No sooner had she eaten it, however, than the Prudhan's daughter went home and said to her mother, "I do not wonder the seven Princesses will not eat the dinner you prepare for them, for by their mother's grave there grows a beautiful pomelo tree, and they go there every day and eat the pomeloes.

I ate one, and it was the nicest I have ever tasted. The cruel Ranee was much vexed at hearing this, and all next day she stayed in her room, and told the Raja that she had a very bad headache. The Raja was deeply grieved, and said to his wife, "What can I do for you? By your dead wife's tomb there grows a fine pomelo tree; you must bring that here, and boil it, root and branch, and put a little of the water in which it has been boiled, on my forehead, and that will cure my headache.

Next day, when the seven Princesses went as usual to the grave of their mother, the pomelo tree had disappeared. Then they all began to cry very bitterly. Now there was by the Ranee's tomb a small tank, and as they were crying they saw that the tank was filled with a rich cream-like substance, which quickly hardened into a thick white cake. At seeing this all the Princesses were very glad, and they ate some of the cake, and liked it; and [26] next day the same thing happened, and so it went on for many days.

Every morning the Princesses went to their mother's grave, and found the little tank filled with the nourishing cream-like cake. Then the cruel step-mother said to her daughter: "I cannot tell how it is, I have had the pomelo tree which used to grow by the Ranee's grave destroyed, and yet the Princesses grow no thinner, nor look more sad, though they never eat the dinner I give them.

I cannot tell how it is! Next day, while the Princesses were eating the cream cake, who should come by but their step-mother's daughter. Balna saw her first, and said, "See, sisters, there comes that girl again. Let us sit round the edge of the tank and not allow her to see it, for if we give her some of our cake, she will go and tell her mother; and that will be very unfortunate for us. The other sisters, however, thought Balna unnecessarily suspicious, and instead of following her advice, they gave the Prudhan's daughter some of the cake, and she went home and told her mother all about it.

The Ranee, on hearing how well the Princesses fared, was exceedingly angry, and sent her servants to pull down the dead Ranee's tomb, and fill the little tank with the ruins. And not content with this, she next day pretended to be very, very ill—in fact, at the point of death—and when the Raja was much grieved, and asked her whether it was in his power to procure her any remedy, she said to him: "Only one thing can save my life, but I know you will not do it.

Then, feeling he could not kill them, the Raja spoke kindly to them, and told them to come out into the jungle with him; and there he made a fire and cooked some rice, and gave it to them. But in the afternoon, it being very hot, the seven Princesses all fell asleep, and when he saw they were fast asleep, the Raja, their father, stole away and left them for he feared his wife , saying to himself: "It is better my poor daughters should die here, than be killed by their step-mother.

He then shot a deer, and returning home, put some of its blood on the forehead and hands of the Ranee, and she thought then that he had really killed the Princesses, and said she felt quite well. Meantime the seven Princesses awoke, and when they found themselves all alone in the thick jungle they were much frightened, and began to call out as loud as they could, in hopes of making their father hear; but he was by that time far away, and would not have been able to hear them even had their voices been as loud as thunder.

It so happened that this very day the seven young sons of a neighbouring Raja chanced to be hunting in that same jungle, and as they were returning home, after the day's sport was over, the youngest Prince said to his brothers: "Stop, I think I hear some one crying and calling out. Let us go in the direction of the sound, and find out what it is.

So the seven Princes rode through the wood until they came to the place where the seven Princesses sat crying and wringing their hands. At the sight of them the young Princes were very much astonished, and still more so on learning their story; and they settled that each should take one of these poor forlorn ladies home with him, and marry her. And when they got to their own land, there was great rejoicing throughout the kingdom, at the marriage of the seven young Princes to seven such beautiful Princesses. About a year after this Balna had a little son, and his uncles and aunts were so fond of the boy that it was as if he had seven fathers and seven mothers.


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None of the other Princes and Princesses had any children, so the son of the seventh Prince and Balna was acknowledged their heir by all the rest. They had thus lived very happily for some time, when one fine day the seventh Prince Balna's husband said he would go out hunting, and away he went; and they waited long for him, but he never came back. Then his six brothers said they would go and see what had become of him; and they went away, but they also did not return.

And the seven Princesses grieved very much, for they feared that their kind husbands must have been killed. One day, not long after this had happened, as Balna was rocking her baby's cradle, and whilst her sisters were working in the room below, there came to the palace door a man in a long black dress, who said that he was a Fakir, and came to beg. The servants said to him, "You cannot go into the palace—the Raja's sons have all gone away; we think they must be dead, and their widows cannot be interrupted by your begging.

Punchkin Fakir wandered through the palace, and saw many beautiful things there, till at last he reached the room where Balna sat singing beside her little boy's cradle. The Magician thought her more beautiful than all the other beautiful things he had seen, insomuch that he asked her to go home with him and to marry him.

But she said, "My husband, I fear, is dead, but my little boy is still quite young; I will stay here and teach him to grow up a clever man, and when he is grown up he shall go out into the world, and try and learn tidings of his father. Heaven forbid that I should ever leave him, or marry you. As Punchkin passed through the palace gate the servants said to him, "Where did you get that pretty little dog?

Soon after this, the six elder Princesses heard the little baby, their nephew, begin to cry, and when they went upstairs they were much surprised to find him all alone, and Balna nowhere to be seen. Then they questioned the servants, and when they heard of the Fakir and the little black dog, they guessed what had happened, and sent in every direction seeking them, but neither the Fakir nor the dog were to be found.

What could six poor women do? They gave up all hopes of ever seeing their kind husbands, and their sister, and her husband, again, and devoted themselves thenceforward to teaching and taking care of their little nephew. Thus time went on, till Balna's son was fourteen years old. Then, one day, his aunts told him the history of the family; and no sooner did he hear it, than he was seized with a great desire to go in search of his father and mother and uncles, and if he could find them alive to bring them home again.

His aunts, on learning his determination, were much alarmed and tried to dissuade him, saying, "We have lost our husbands, and our sister and her husband, and you are now our sole hope; if you go away, what shall we do? At last, after he had journeyed many hundreds of weary miles, and become almost hopeless of ever hearing anything further of his parents, he one day came to a country that seemed full of stones, and rocks, and trees, and there he saw a large palace with a high tower; hard by which was a Malee's little house. As he was looking about, the Malee's wife saw him, and ran out of the house and said, "My dear boy, who are you that dare venture to this dangerous place?

Then the Malee's wife said, "This country and this palace belong to a great enchanter; he is all powerful, and if any one displeases him, he can turn them into stones and trees. All the rocks and trees you see here were living people once, and the Magician turned them to what they now are. Some time ago a Raja's son came here, and shortly afterwards came his six brothers, and they were all turned into stones and trees; and these are not the only unfortunate ones, for up in that tower lives a beautiful Princess, whom the Magician has kept prisoner there for twelve years, because she hates him and will not marry him.

Then the little Prince thought, "These must be my parents and my uncles. I have found what I seek at last. To this the Prince agreed. So the Malee's wife dressed him up in a saree, and pretended that he was her daughter. One day, not long after this, as the Magician was walking in his garden he saw the little girl as he thought playing about, and asked her who she was. She told him she was the Malee's daughter, and the Magician said, "You are a pretty little girl, and to-morrow you shall take a present of flowers from me to the beautiful lady who lives in the tower.

The young Prince was much delighted at hearing this, and went immediately to inform the Malee's wife; after consultation with whom he determined that it would be more safe for him to retain his disguise, and trust to the chance of a favourable opportunity for establishing some communication with his mother, if it were indeed she. Now it happened that at Balna's marriage her husband had given her a small gold ring on which her name was engraved, and she had put it on her little son's finger when he was a baby, and afterwards when he was older his aunts had had it enlarged for him, so that he was still able to wear it.

The Malee's wife advised him to fasten the well-known treasure to one of the bouquets he presented to his mother, and trust to her recognising it. This was not to be done without difficulty, as such a strict watch was kept over the poor Princess for fear of her ever establishing communication with her friends , that though the supposed Malee's daughter was permitted to take her flowers every day, the Magician or one of his slaves was always in the [33] room at the time.

At last one day, however, opportunity favoured him, and when no one was looking, the boy tied the ring to a nosegay, and threw it at Balna's feet. It fell with a clang on the floor, and Balna, looking to see what made the strange sound, found the little ring tied to the flowers. On recognising it, she at once believed the story her son told her of his long search, and begged him to advise her as to what she had better do; at the same time entreating him on no account to endanger his life by trying to rescue her. She told him that for twelve long years the Magician had kept her shut up in the tower because she refused to marry him, and she was so closely guarded that she saw no hope of release.

Now Balna's son was a bright, clever boy, so he said, "Do not fear, dear mother; the first thing to do is to discover how far the Magician's power extends, in order that we may be able to liberate my father and uncles, whom he has imprisoned in the form of rocks and trees. You have spoken to him angrily for twelve long years; now rather speak kindly. Tell him you have given up all hopes of again seeing the husband you have so long mourned, and say you are willing to marry him. Then endeavour to find out what his power consists in, and whether he is immortal, or can be put to death.

Balna determined to take her son's advice; and the next day sent for Punchkin, and spoke to him as had been suggested. The Magician, greatly delighted, begged her to allow the wedding to take place as soon as possible. But she told him that before she married him he must allow her a little more time, in which she might make his [34] acquaintance, and that, after being enemies so long, their friendship could but strengthen by degrees. Can death never touch you? And are you too great an enchanter ever to feel human suffering?

Far, far away, hundreds of thousands of miles from this, there lies a desolate country covered with thick jungle. In the midst of the jungle grows a circle of palm trees, and in the centre of the circle stand six chattees full of water, piled one above another: below the sixth chattee is a small cage which contains a little green parrot; on the life of the parrot depends my life; and if the parrot is killed I must die. It is, however," he added, "impossible that the parrot should sustain any injury, both on account of the inaccessibility of the country, and because, by my appointment, many thousand genii surround the palm trees, and kill all who approach the place.

Balna told her son what Punchkin had said; but at the same time implored him to give up all idea of getting the parrot. The Prince, however, replied, "Mother, unless I can get hold of that parrot, you, and my father, and uncles, cannot be liberated: be not afraid, I will shortly return. Do you, meantime, keep the Magician in good humour—still putting off your marriage with him on various pretexts; and before he finds out the cause of delay, I will be here.

Many, many weary miles did he travel, till at last he came to a thick jungle; and, being very tired, sat down under a tree and fell asleep. He was awakened by a soft rustling sound, and looking about him, saw a large serpent which was making its way to an eagle's nest built in the tree under which he lay, and in the nest were two young eagles. The Prince seeing the danger of the young birds, drew his sword, and killed the serpent; at the same moment a rushing sound was heard in the air, and the two old eagles, who had been out hunting for food for their young ones, returned.

They quickly saw the dead serpent and the young Prince standing over it; and the old mother eagle said to him, "Dear boy, for many years all our young ones have been devoured by that cruel serpent; you have now saved the lives of our children; whenever you are in need, therefore, send to us and we will help you; and as for these little eagles, take them, and let them be your servants. At this the Prince was very glad, and the two eaglets crossed their wings, on which he mounted; and they carried him far, far away over the thick jungles, until he came to the place where grew the circle of palm trees, in the midst of which stood the six chattees full of water.

It was the middle of the day, and the heat was very great. All round the trees were the genii fast asleep; nevertheless, there were such countless thousands of them, that it would have been quite impossible for any one to walk through their ranks to the place; down swooped the strong-winged eaglets—down jumped the Prince; in an instant he had overthrown the six chattees full of water, and seized the little green parrot, which he rolled up in his cloak; while, [36] as he mounted again into the air, all the genii below awoke, and finding their treasure gone, set up a wild and melancholy howl.

Away, away flew the little eagles, till they came to their home in the great tree; then the Prince said to the old eagles, "Take back your little ones; they have done me good service; if ever again I stand in need of help, I will not fail to come to you. Punchkin saw him, and came to him quickly, and said, "My boy, where did you get that parrot? Give it to me, I pray you. But the Prince answered, "Oh no, I cannot give away my parrot, it is a great pet of mine; I have had it many years.

Then the Magician said, "If it is an old favourite, I can understand your not caring to give it away; but come what will you sell it for? Then Punchkin got frightened, and said, "Anything, anything; name what price you will, and it shall be yours. The Magician immediately waved his wand again; and, whilst he cried, in an imploring voice, "Give me my parrot!

Then the boy took hold of the parrot, and tore off one of its wings; and as he did so the Magician's right arm fell off. Punchkin then stretched out his left arm, crying, "Give me my parrot! The Prince pulled off the parrot's right leg, the Magician's right leg fell off: the Prince pulled off the parrot's left leg, down fell the Magician's left. Nothing remained of him save the limbless body and the head; but still he rolled his eyes, and cried, "Give me my parrot!

Then they let Balna out of the tower; and she, her son, and the seven Princes went to their own country, and lived very happily ever afterwards. And as to the rest of the world, every one went to his own house. He hung the pot on a peg on the wall, placed his couch beneath, and looking intently at it all the night, he thought, "Ah, that pot is indeed brimful of rice.

Now, if there should be a famine, I should certainly make a hundred rupees by it. With this I shall buy a couple of goats. They will have young ones every six months, and thus I shall have a whole herd of goats. Then, with the goats, I shall buy cows. As soon as they have calved, I shall sell the calves. Then, with the calves, I shall buy buffaloes; with the buffaloes, mares.

When the mares have foaled, I shall have plenty of horses; and when I sell them, plenty of gold. With that gold I shall get a house with four wings. And then a Brahman will come to my house, and will give me his beautiful daughter, with a large dowry. She will have a son, and I shall call him Somasarman. When he is old enough to be danced on his father's knee, I shall sit with a book at the back of the stable, and while I am reading, the boy will see me, jump from his mother's lap, and run towards me to be danced on my knee.

He will come too near the horse's hoof, and, full of anger, I shall call to my wife, 'Take the baby; take him! Then I get up, and give her such a kick with my foot. All the rice fell over him, and made him quite white. Therefore, I say, "He who makes foolish plans for the future will be white all over, like the father of Somasarman. The brothers were married, but their wives did not do the cooking for the family. It was done by their sister, who stopped at home to cook.

The wives for this reason bore their sister-in-law much ill-will, and at length they combined together to oust her from the office of cook and general provider, so that one of themselves might obtain it. They said, "She does not go out to the fields to work, but remains quietly at home, and yet she has not the meals ready at the proper time. In this way she will be delayed. Let the water not flow into her pitcher, and you may keep the maiden as your own. At noon when she went to bring water, it suddenly dried up before her, and she began to weep.

Then after [41] a while the water began slowly to rise. When it reached her ankles she tried to fill her pitcher, but it would not go under the water. Being frightened she began to wail and cry to her brother:. The water continued to rise until it reached her knee, when she began to wail again: [42].


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The pitcher filled with water, and along with it she sank and was drowned. The Bonga then transformed her into a Bonga like himself, and carried her off. After a time she re-appeared as a bamboo growing on the embankment of the tank in which she had been drowned. When the bamboo had grown to an immense size, a Jogi, who was in the habit of passing that way, seeing it, said to himself, "This will make a splendid fiddle. The instrument had a superior tone and delighted all who heard it. The Jogi carried it with him when he went a-begging, and through the influence of its sweet music he returned home every evening with a full wallet.

He now and then visited, when on his rounds, the house of the Bonga girl's brothers, and the strains of the fiddle affected them greatly. Some of them were moved even to tears, for the fiddle seemed to wail as one in bitter anguish. The elder brother wished to purchase it, and offered to support the Jogi for a whole year if he would consent to part with his wonderful instrument. The Jogi, however, knew its value, and refused to sell it. It so happened that the Jogi some time after went to the house of a village chief, and after playing a tune or two on his fiddle asked for something to eat.

They offered to buy his fiddle and promised a high price for it, but he refused to sell it, as his fiddle brought to him his means of livelihood. When they saw that he was not to be prevailed upon, they gave him food and a plentiful supply of liquor. Of the latter he drank so freely that he presently became intoxicated.

While he was in this condition, they took away his fiddle, and substituted their own old one for it. When the Jogi recovered, he missed his instrument, and suspecting that it had been stolen asked them to return it to him. They denied having taken it, so he had to depart, leaving his fiddle behind him. The chief's son, being a musician, used to play on the Jogi's fiddle, and in his hands the music it gave forth delighted the ears of all who heard it.

When all the household were absent at their labours in the fields, the Bonga girl used to come out of the bamboo fiddle, and prepared the family meal. Having eaten her own share, she placed that of the chief's son under his bed, and covering it up to keep off the dust, re-entered the fiddle. This happening every day, the other members of the household thought that some girl friend of theirs was in this manner showing her interest in the young man, so they did not trouble themselves to find out how it came about.

The young chief, however, was determined to watch, and see which of his girl friends was so attentive to his comfort. He said in his own mind, "I will catch her to-day, and give her a sound beating; she is causing me to be ashamed before the others. In a short time the girl came out of the bamboo fiddle, and began to dress her hair. Having completed her toilet, she cooked the meal of rice as usual, and having eaten some herself, she placed the young man's portion under his bed, as before, and was about to enter the fiddle again, when he, running out from his hiding-place, caught her in his arms.

The Bonga girl exclaimed, "Fie! But from to-day, you and I are one. When the others returned home in the evening, they saw that she was both a human being and a Bonga, and they rejoiced exceedingly. Now in course of time the Bonga girl's family became very poor, and her brothers on one occasion came to the chief's house on a visit.

The Bonga girl recognised them at once, but they did not know who she was. She brought them water on their arrival, and afterwards set cooked rice before them. Then sitting down near them, she began in wailing tones to upbraid them on account of the treatment she had been subjected to by their wives. She related all that had befallen her, and wound up by saying, "You must have known it all, and yet you did not interfere to save me. Now at that time the water used to run short at the dry season in a certain pond, not over large, in which there were a good many fish. And a crane thought on seeing the fish:.

When the fish saw him, they asked him, "What are you sitting there for, lost in thought? So I was thinking, 'What in the world will these fish do now? It's eating us, one after the other, that you're aiming at. So long as you trust me, I won't eat you. But if you don't believe me that there is such a pond, send one of you with me to go and see it. Then they trusted him, and handed over to him one of their number—a big fellow, blind of one eye, whom they thought sharp enough in any emergency, afloat or ashore.

Him the crane took with him, let him go in the pond, showed him the whole of it, brought him back, and let him go again close to the other fish. And he told them all the glories of the pond. And when they heard what he said, they exclaimed, "All right, sir! You may take us with you. Then the crane took the old purblind fish first to the bank of the other pond, and alighted in a Varana-tree growing on the bank there. But he threw it into a fork of the tree, struck it with his beak, and killed it; and then ate its flesh, and threw its bones away at the foot of the tree.

Then he went back and called out:. And in that manner he took all the fish, one by one, and ate them, till he came back and found no more! But there was still a crab left behind there; and the crane thought he would eat him too, and called out:. Come along. I'll take you too! Then said the crab to himself, "If this fellow once got hold of fish, he would never let them go in a pond! Now if he should really put me into the pond, it would be capital; but if he doesn't—then I'll cut his throat, and kill him! If you let me catch hold of you round the neck with my claws, I shall be glad to go with you.

And the other did not see that he was trying to outwit him, and agreed. So the crab caught hold of his neck with his claws as securely as with a pair of blacksmith's pincers, and called out, "Off with you, now! You mean me to understand, I suppose, that I am your slave, who has to lift you up and carry you about with him! Now cast your eye upon the heap of fish-bones lying at the root of yonder Varana-tree. Just as I have eaten those fish, every one of them, just so I will devour you as well! On the contrary, is it you that I am going to destroy. For you in your folly have not seen that I was outwitting you.

If we die, we die both together; for I will cut off this head of yours, and cast it to the ground! Then gasping, and with tears trickling from his eyes, and trembling with the fear of death, the crane beseeched him, saying, "O my Lord! Indeed I did not intend to eat you.

Grant me my life! And he turned round and stepped down into the pond, and placed the crab on the mud at its edge. But the crab cut through its neck as clean as one would cut a lotus-stalk with a hunting-knife, and then only entered the water! When the Genius who lived in the Varana-tree saw this strange affair, he made the wood resound with his plaudits, uttering in a pleasant voice the verse: [50]. He had also an only son called Prince Majnun, who was a handsome boy with white teeth, red lips, blue eyes, red cheeks, red hair, and a white skin.

This boy was very fond of playing with the Wazir's son, Husain Mahamat, in King Dantal's garden, which was very large and full of delicious fruits, and flowers, and trees. They used to take their little knives there and cut the fruits and eat them. King Dantal had a teacher for them to teach them to read and write. One day, when they were grown two fine young men, Prince Majnun said to his father, "Husain Mahamat and I should like to go and hunt. The Raja of the Phalana country was called Munsuk Raja, and he had a daughter named Laili, who was very beautiful; she had brown eyes and black hair.

One night, some time before Prince Majnun came to her father's kingdom, as she slept, Khuda sent to her an angel in the form of a man who told her that she should marry Prince Majnun and no one else, and that this was Khuda's command to her. When Laili woke she told her father of the angel's visit to her as she slept; but her father paid no attention to her story. From that time she began repeating, "Majnun, Majnun; I want Majnun," and would say nothing else.

Even as she sat and ate her food she kept saying, "Majnun, Majnun; I want Majnun. Meanwhile, Majnun and Husain Mahamat came to hunt in the Phalana country; and as they were riding about, Laili came out on her horse to eat the air, and rode behind them. All the time she kept saying, "Majnun, Majnun; I want Majnun.

At this Laili looked at him, and the moment she saw him she fell deeply in love with him, and she said to herself, "I am sure that is the Prince Majnun that Khuda says I am to marry. As it happened, the prince left the Phalana kingdom that night, [53] and when Laili heard he was gone, she went quite mad. She would not listen to a word her father, or her mother, or her servants said to her, but went off into the jungle, and wandered from jungle to jungle, till she got farther and farther away from her own country.

All the time she kept saying, "Majnun, Majnun; I want Majnun;" and so she wandered about for twelve years. At the end of the twelve years she met a fakir—he was really an angel, but she did not know this—who asked her, "Why do you always say, 'Majnun, Majnun; I want Majnun'? She went on and on, and at last she came to the Bhagirathi river. There was a great big fish called the Rohu fish.

It was yawning just as she got up to it, and she instantly jumped down its throat into its stomach. All the time she kept saying, "Majnun, Majnun. By degrees he got tired and went slower, and a crow came and perched on his back, and said "Caw, caw. Crow," said the poor fish "do see what is in my stomach that makes such a noise. This news did not comfort the poor Rohu, and he swam on and on till he came to Prince Majnun's country. There he stopped. And a jackal came down to the river to drink. After the jackal came an enormous snake.

The snake said, "Open your mouth wide, and I'll go down and see what it is. She was now very old. Twelve years she had wandered about the jungle, and for twelve years she had lived inside her Rohu; and she was no longer beautiful, and had lost her teeth. The snake took her on his back and carried her into the country, and there he put her down, and she wandered on and on till she got to Majnun's court-house, where King Majnun was sitting.

There some men heard her crying, "Majnun, Majnun; I want Majnun," and they asked her what she wanted. So they went in and said to Prince Majnun, "An old woman outside says she wants you. Then I went mad, and I have wandered [56] about all these years looking for you. And there were great feasts, and they were married, and travelled to the Phalana country to see her father and mother.

Now Laili's father and mother had wept so much for their daughter that they had become quite blind, and her father kept always repeating, "Laili, Laili, Laili. As soon as the father and mother saw Laili, they hugged her and kissed her, and then they had the wedding all over again amid great rejoicings. Prince Majnun and Laili stayed with Munsuk Raja and his wife for three years, and then they returned to King Dantal, and lived happily for some time with him. They used to go out hunting, and they often went from country to country to eat the air and amuse themselves. One day Prince Majnun said to Laili, "Let us go through this jungle.

And as they were going through it, Khuda thought, "I should like to know how much Prince Majnun loves his wife. Would he be very sorry if she died? And would he marry another wife? I will see. Prince Majnun was in great sorrow and grief when he saw his dear Laili turned into a little heap of ashes; and he went straight home to his father, and for a long, long time he would not be comforted.

After a great many years he grew more cheerful and happy, and began to go again into his father's beautiful garden with Husain Mahamat. King Dantal wished his son to marry again. Laili is dead. She will never come back to you," said the father. Meanwhile Laili was living in the jungle where her husband had left her a little heap of ashes. As soon as Majnun had gone, the fakir had taken her ashes and made them quite clean, and then he had mixed clay and water with the ashes, and made the figure of a woman with them, and so Laili regained her human form, and Khuda sent life into it.

But Laili had become once more a hideous old woman, with a long, long nose, and teeth like tusks; just such an old woman, excepting her teeth, as she had been when she came out of the Rohu fish; and she lived in the jungle, and neither ate nor drank, and she kept on saying, "Majnun, Majnun; I want Majnun. At last the angel who had come as a fakir and thrown the powder at her, said to Khuda, "Of what use is it that this woman should sit in the jungle crying, crying for ever, [58] 'Majnun, Majnun; I want Majnun,' and eating and drinking nothing?

Let me take her to Prince Majnun. Then she must go to the palace, and she will only regain her human shape when Prince Majnun loves her, feeds her with his own food, and lets her sleep in his bed. So the angel came to Laili again as a fakir and carried her to King Dantal's garden. But you must not speak to him, if he is afraid of you; and should he be afraid of you, you will the next day become a little white dog. Laili stayed in the garden, hidden in the tall grass, till Prince Majnun and Husain Mahamat came to walk in the garden.

King Dantal was now a very old man, and Husain Mahamat, though he was really only as old as Prince Majnun, looked a great deal older than the prince, who had been made quite young again when he married Laili. As Prince Majnun and the Wazir's son walked in the garden, they gathered the fruit as they had done as little children, only they bit the fruit with their teeth; they did not cut it. While Majnun was busy eating a fruit in this way, and was talking to Husain Mahamat, he turned towards him and saw Laili walking behind the Wazir's son.


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They ran to King Dantal, and Majnun told him there was a Rakshas or a demon in the garden that had come to eat them. And if it had been a Rakshas, it would not have eaten you. They had the garden searched for the terrible old woman, but found nothing, and King Dantal told his son he was very silly to be so much frightened.

However, Prince Majnun would not walk in the garden any more. The next day Laili turned into a pretty little dog; and in this shape she came into the palace, where Prince Majnun soon became very fond of her. She followed him everywhere, went with him when he was out hunting, and helped him to catch his game, and Prince Majnun fed her with milk, or bread, or anything else he was eating, and at night the little dog slept in his bed. But one night the little dog disappeared, and in its stead there lay the little old woman who had frightened him so much in the garden; and now Prince Majnun was quite sure she was a Rakshas, or a demon, or some such horrible [60] thing come to eat him; and in his terror he cried out, "What do you want?

Oh, do not eat me; do not eat me! I am your wife Laili, and I want to marry you. Don't you remember how you would go through that jungle, though I begged and begged you not to go, for I told you that harm would happen to me, and then a fakir came and threw powder in my face, and I became a heap of ashes.

But Khuda gave me my life again, and brought me here, after I had stayed a long, long while in the jungle crying for you, and now I am obliged to be a little dog; but if you will marry me, I shall not be a little dog any more. I am sure you are a Rakshas or a demon come to eat me," and he was in great terror. In the morning the old woman had turned into the little dog, and the prince went to his father and told him all that had happened.

How can a strong man like you be so easily frightened? How can I marry such an old woman as you are? That night as he lay trembling in bed the little old woman lay there in place of the dog, crying "Majnun, Majnun, I want to marry you. I have loved you all these long, long years. When I was in my father's kingdom a young girl, I knew of you, though you knew nothing of [61] me, and we should have been married then if you had not gone away so suddenly, and for long, long years I followed you.

Laili said, "Oh, that is quite easy. Khuda will make me a young girl again. In two days' time you must go into the garden, and there you will see a beautiful fruit. You must gather it and bring it into your room and cut it open yourself very gently, and you must not open it when your father or anybody else is with you, but when you are quite alone; for I shall be in the fruit quite naked, without any clothes at all on.

Prince Majnun told all this to his father, who told him to do all the old woman had bidden him. In two days' time he and the Wazir's son walked in the garden, and there they saw a large, lovely red fruit. Then Majnun took the fruit and began to cut it open [62] tremblingly, for he shook with fear; and when he had cut it, out stepped Laili, young and far more beautiful than she had ever been.

At the sight of her extreme beauty, Majnun fell backwards fainting on the floor. Laili took off his turban and wound it all round herself like a sari for she had no clothes at all on , and then she called King Dantal, and said to him sadly, "Why has Majnun fallen down like this? Why will he not speak to me? He never used to be afraid of me; and he has seen me so many, many times. King Dantal answered, "It is because you are so beautiful. You are far, far more beautiful than you ever were. But he will be very happy directly. After some time had passed very happily, Prince Majnun and his wife went out to eat the air.

They rode on the same horse, and had only a groom with them. They came to another kingdom, to a beautiful garden. Now, as he was looking at the flowers, Laili saw Chumman Basa coming towards them, and she read in his eyes that he meant to kill her husband and seize her. So she said to Majnun, "Come, come, let us go; do not go near that bad man.

I see in his eyes, and I feel in my heart, that he will kill you to seize me. Anyhow, I am so near to him that I could not get away. Laili sat quite still on her horse, and as the Raja came towards her she said, "Why did you kill my husband?

चिड़चिड़ा बूढ़ा आदमी - बच्चों की हिंदी कहानियाँ - Hindi Fairy Tales

But she put her hand in her pocket and pulled out a tiny knife, only as long as her hand was broad, and this knife unfolded itself in one instant till it was such a length! Then Laili slipped down off her horse, and she went to Majnun's dead body, and she cut her little finger inside her hand straight down from the top of her nail to her palm, and out of this gushed blood like healing medicine. Then she put Majnun's head on his shoulders, and smeared her healing blood all over the wound, and Majnun woke up and said, "What a delightful sleep I have had!

Why, I feel as if I had slept for years! Then she set the wicked Raja's head straight on his shoulders, and she [65] squeezed the wound in her finger till a little blood-medicine came out of it. Then she smeared this over the place where her knife had passed, and just as she saw the Raja opening his eyes, she began to run, and she ran, and ran so fast, that she outran the Raja, who tried to catch her; and she sprang up on the horse behind her husband, and they rode so fast, so fast, till they reached King Dantal's palace.

There Prince Majnun told everything to his father, who was horrified and angry. But for her, you would be now dead. And he made so much of Laili. He loved her dearly; he could not do enough for her. Then he built a splendid palace for her and his son, with a great deal of ground about it, and lovely gardens, and gave them great wealth, and heaps of servants to wait on them. But he would not allow any but their servants to enter their gardens and palace, and he would not allow Majnun to go out of them, nor Laili; "for," said King Dantal, "Laili is so beautiful, that perhaps some one may kill my son to take her away.

He tried in vain to get out through the bars, and rolled and bit with rage and grief when he failed. By chance a poor Brahman came by. Now when the tiger sobbed and sighed and wept and swore, the pious Brahman's heart softened, and at last he consented to open the door of the cage. Out popped the tiger, and, seizing the poor man, cried, "What a fool you [67] are! What is to prevent my eating you now, for after being cooped up so long I am just terribly hungry! In vain the Brahman pleaded for his life; the most he could gain was a promise to abide by the decision of the first three things he chose to question as to the justice of the tiger's action.

So the Brahman first asked a pipal tree what it thought of the matter, but the pipal tree replied coldly, "What have you to complain about? Don't I give shade and shelter to every one who passes by, and don't they in return tear down my branches to feed their cattle? Don't whimper—be a man! Then the Brahman, sad at heart, went further afield till he saw a buffalo turning a well-wheel; but he fared no better from it, for it answered, "You are a fool to expect gratitude!

Look at me! Whilst I gave milk they fed me on cotton-seed and oil-cake, but now I am dry they yoke me here, and give me refuse as fodder! Here am I, useful to everybody, yet all, rich and poor, great and small, trample on me as they go past, giving me nothing but the ashes of their pipes and the husks of their grain! On this the Brahman turned back sorrowfully, and on the way he met a jackal, who called out, "Why, what's the matter, Mr. You look as miserable as a fish out of water! The Brahman told him all that had occurred. The Brahman told it all over again, but the jackal shook his head in a distracted sort of way, and still could not understand.

I will go to the place where it all happened, and then perhaps I shall be able to give a judgment. So they returned to the cage, by which the tiger was waiting for the Brahman, and sharpening his teeth and claws. The tiger consented, and the Brahman began the whole story over again, not missing a single detail, and spinning as long a yarn as possible. You were in the cage, and the tiger came walking by——". I was in the cage. I was in the cage—no I wasn't—dear! Let me see—the tiger was in the Brahman, and the cage came walking by——no, that's not it, either!

Well, don't mind me, but begin your dinner, for I shall never understand! Look here—I am the tiger——". Please don't be angry, my lord, but what is the usual way? At this the tiger lost patience, and, jumping into the cage, cried, "This way! Now do you understand how it was? The second son thought over the horoscope, and said to himself:. The sayings of my father never failed. I have seen them prove true to the last word while he was living; and how has he fixed my horoscope!

Now comes the most curious part of the horoscope, that I am to 'have some happiness afterwards!

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Indian fairy tales Indian fairy tales
Indian fairy tales Indian fairy tales
Indian fairy tales Indian fairy tales
Indian fairy tales Indian fairy tales
Indian fairy tales Indian fairy tales
Indian fairy tales Indian fairy tales

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